accident, back pain, car accident, chronic pain, disability, health, medical device, nerve pain, pain, pain management, Quell, TENS unit
Comments 137

The Quell Pain Relief Device: Living Up to Its Label?

The Quell Pain Relief Device (1)

My long-awaited Quell pain relief device has finally arrived!

As soon as I saw the FedEx truck rumble by, I heaved myself out of my chair and hurried to the front door, hoping to see that plain, unassuming box sitting on the front step. There it was, as I’d dreamed for months. I basically ripped it open with my teeth.

This was 0.02 seconds after FedEx dropped off the box.

This was 0.02 seconds after FedEx dropped off the package.

I backed the Quell IndieGogo the moment I discovered it during the winter; it had already tripled its $100,000 goal. At this point my fairly useless pain clinic says I have exhausted most of my options in terms of what they can provide, unless I want to try an IV lidocaine/ketamine mix. I had the IV lidocaine infusion two weeks ago, and the aftermath was nothing short of a pain-riddled disaster. I’m grasping at straws here.

Quell makes grand promises in its sleek promotional video. As PSFK said:

TENS systems aren’t new in the market but Quell’s prescription-free, user-friendly and discrete approach is special. The Quell, no matter where the body pain is, could be left strapped at the calf where there is an abundance of nerve endings. It can also be worn 24/7 to provide round the clock pain relief.

I drowned in their website, seeking every bit of information I could. How was this device different than others on the market? How is it different than the TENS unit I already own? There are already devices worn on the calf that treat sciatica and other lower-body ailments. There are an abundance of nerve endings in that area, so it makes sense — but how can it reach the upper half of the body?

The Quell device claims to treat the entire body, producing a natural opioid-like effect through the use of electro-stimulation. It can give you relief day or night, switching on for 60-minute therapy sessions (it switches off after an hour in order to keep the user from developing resistance and switches to 80 percent power when the user is asleep). As they say on their website FAQ:

How is Quell different than other TENS devices?

Quell’s proven wearable intensive nerve stimulation (WINS) technology is double the strength of other products on the market today, enabling the device to trigger broad pain relief that covers other areas of your body. Quell’s OptiTherapy™ calibrates to your optimal stimulation level ensuring you receive maximum relief.

As it turned out, I didn’t care that I had no understanding of its schematics. I dove right in past the technical specs and the glowing media reviews.

Let's look inside!

Let’s look inside!

Dis is ma leg. LOOK AT IT.

Dis is mah leg. LOOK AT IT.

The Quell electrode lasts for two (2) weeks.

The Quell electrode, which snaps into the calf band, lasts for two weeks. Replacement electrodes cost $30. As the Quell is available over the counter for $250 and does not require a prescription, insurance will currently not cover the device or its electrodes.

I got this thing set up in less than five minutes.

I got the Quell out of the box and set up in three minutes.

Some Fattie for all of you cat lovers out there.

Some Fattie for all of you cat lovers out there. Surprisingly, we bought the couch without realizing that she blends into it.

The Quell is currently strapped onto my leg. I can feel the gentle TENS-like vibration against my calf. According to the manual, the device can provide relief in 15 minutes. The synced iPhone app states that I have had it on for 30 minutes as of this writing, but I am also reclining in a chair. I am going to attempt some movement and report back.

… FIFTEEN MINUTES LATER …

I love this device, and no, I’m not being paid for this blog post. I have 11 minutes left of my first 60-minute session. I just did some gentle yoga to test my range of motion and then enjoyed lunch on the back porch, sitting in an uncomfortable metal chair without much trouble. I can still feel the pain in my back and neck, but it feels removed. Like there’s a layer of fluffy gauze in between us. It’s like I am disconnected from my body. The tingling on my calf was distracting at first, but now it feels reassuring, telling me that something is working.

Honestly, I have no idea how this device is different than others. I know what the company says, but I don’t get how it operates. It uses “well-established TENS technology,” and I have a TENS unit. It does not feel like this, but it is somehow utilizing the same technology. The Boston Globe looked into this:

A TENS machine sends low-voltage electricity through the patient’s nervous system. In response, the patient’s body increases its output of endorphins and enkephalins, two naturally occurring chemicals that tend to reduce pain. The treatment can be an effective alternative to drugs and poses no risk of addiction.

Basically, it’s a super-TENS. It uses the cluster of nerves in the calf to send pain-blocking signals all over the body. Even after a session ends, the effect is supposed to continue for up to 40 minutes. It is to be used as a complement to a patient’s normal medication regimen, boosting up those effects and filling the gap that is not covered by traditional prescriptions or methodologies.

And now, as I check the iPhone app: “Next therapy: 18 minutes away.” I am going to keep monitoring its effects. There’s a 60-day money-back guarantee, since TENS devices don’t always work for everyone. However, I am feeling very optimistic about this product and am looking forward to that next therapy session.

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137 Comments

  1. I have a Quell as well, and I am not all that thrilled with it,
    1. The second day, a couple of the electrode gel patches stuck to my skin and peeled COMPLETELY OFF THE strip. At the VERY high price they charge for these, I can’t believe this is such poor quality.
    3. My Quell doesn’t allow me to sleep thru the night. It wakes me up with its handy “take off and sit out your skin” warning every time I try to wear it thru the night. I end up having to get up to take the thing off at 3am – fumbling with the electrodes that stick to every fuzzy thing…so much for helping w/sleep!
    So, I call BULLSHIT on their claim of 24/7 pain relief.
    Yes, I contacted customer support and got a canned response that didn’t even address my inquiry. I have since tried MANY more times to contact them and have not received any response.
    While their concept is great, and the science behind the unit finally explained in a research paper on their website (they refused to offer an explanation prior to my receipt of the unit-even though I dumped $250 on the device in their Kickstarter campaign), I can see how this could be a great thing.
    After using it for 2+ weeks, I’m getting the same results I had with my EMPI IF-3 interferential unit. It’s just WAY more expensive than my EMPI to use regularly. $30/mo for electrodes is too expensive. I’m debating whether the portability of the unit is worth the cost of the inferior electrodes.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Frank McGillin says

      I am sorry to hear that you are having problems with your Quell. Our policy is to respond to all issues within 24 hours so your email must have fallen through the cracks. Please email me at frank_mcgillin@neurometrix.com with your contact information and the best time to call and we will follow up immediately.

      Frank

      Liked by 1 person

      • Bai says

        I must have a different version, as mine has never buzzed at me to switch legs to air out my skin. & the only time I had the gel peel off the electrode band was when my kid did it. I’m sorry it’s not working great for you, I’m never giving mine up. Even a little drug free relief is worth it.

        Like

    • Goodness. I’m sorry yours isn’t working so well for you! I have the EMPI IF-3 as well, though I think I like the Quell better at this point — however, I don’t wear it at night, as being flat on my back helps my pain.

      Additionally, I wasn’t sure if I was being psychosomatic in my optimism. I didn’t wear it yesterday because I was with my in-laws and forgot, and I crashed HARD. So maybe it’s not in my head?

      When I saw your comment I started looking through the modes in the app, and you’re right, I can’t see anything other than that “have the therapy last until you fall asleep” mode and then it turns off. Having it buzz and remind you to switch legs at 3 a.m. would be a huge nuisance.

      I figure there will be lots of growing pains, it being first generation and all. I remember getting the very first MP3 player that was available for regular consumers. It held ten songs that you could barely hear, and I thought it was the coolest thing since sliced bread. I’m hoping that our pain control devices follow the same rapid development cycle. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

    • Update on my Quell….having been in the medical research field, I had to dive deeper into the science behind it…it us essentially NOT a TENS – it’s an IF unit. Interferential treatment technology dates waaaay back 50 yrs. the tech in the Quell stimulates the body’s endorphin release system (to simplify the science..) to produce a chemical that works on the body’s opioid receptors – but NOT the ones targeted by pharmaceuticals. Women tend to have a greater response to the endorphins released that attach to this receptor. This is important b/c women don’t receive always proper pain management . Their sx are minimized. More research is needed to get the word out about the 3 different opioid receptors and how they differ between men and women, and how women pain management needs are different than men’s. It’s just too bad that all this anti-opioid stuff is in the media right now – the media has essentially demonized every single person that has chronic pain and needs these medications to live a somewhat normal life. So, we need as many alternatives as we possibly can get our hands on. It sure would be nice insurance paid for this device. I did have a long conversation with tech at Quell about The best way to use this. It tends to be like a pain medication in that you need to take it (on this case use it) every day to keep the levels of endorphins released in your system constant and this reduce the level of pain. Having used it, especially after a hip replacement, I can say that it does work and it reduced my need for pain medications. Reduced- did not eliminate. Thank God for this device, because due to the new prescribing guidelines, I was unable to get any more pain medication after I was released from hospital with. So even after having a major joint replacement I wasn’t even allowed to be treated for the pain. So, “Quell to the rescue.”

      Liked by 2 people

      • This comment is so dense — in a great way — that I have to read it like, six times in order to absorb everything. You are magnificent. Thanks for such an in-depth report!

        Like

      • Jebell says

        It sounds to me that you have been to the wrong Doctors. No patients sx should be minimized, regardless of sex, race, etc. Furthermore, can you enlighten me on the “new prescribing guidelines”. To be unable to get pain medication after release from inpatient care does not sound correct. Thank you.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I think it all depends on where you live and who you see. Even where I live (Boston area), the doctors varied wildly. It took me about three years to find the right doctors. One pain management center wouldn’t even treat with opioid medications (we’re talking even like, Tramadol) while the next hospital would. These days it’s a crapshoot because of the CDC’s new opioid guidelines, which aren’t mandatory, but doctors have been treating them as though they are: http://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/prescribing/guideline.html

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  2. Frank McGillin says

    JW. Quell has three sleep modes. But importantly will never wake you at 3 AM to remind you to change legs The device is smart, Unlike ordinary tens units, Quell has an accelerometer that knows if you are laying down. This not only powers the different sleep modes, but also let Quell know to delay the reminders to switch legs until the morning when you’re active. This is just one example of how the design team focused on making quell fit seamlessly in your life. Going back to sleep modes, The default setting is called gentle bedtime mode, after Quell determinesyou were laying down, it reduces the level of nerve stimulation to make sure it doesn’t interfere with your sleep. You also have the option of continuing therapy at full power, or selecting a bedtime only mode. We you also have the option of continuing therapy at full power, or selecting a bedtime only mode make it easy to customize therapy to meet your unique needs.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Pingback: Piss Off, Pain Management Clinics | Wear, Tear, & Care

  4. Carlos says

    I’ve had trouble with the electrodes, too. The first electrode stopped working after 3 days, the unit gets an orange light and the app tells you that the electrode is disconnected. I emailed the company and they got back to me within 24 hours and told me that they would send me a new packet of two electrodes. So positive marks for the quick customer service. Now, two days later, the second electrode has what I call, “the orange light of death”. I put the original one back on and it worked for 10 minutes and got the orange light again. I really hope that I just got a bad batch of electrodes and that the new ones will be defect free. If they are the same, I have no choice but to return the unit. The quell unit works great, but if all I can get is 3 days of use out of the electrodes, it will just be too expensive to keep. (I keep wondering if I’m doing something wrong, but I can’t think of anything that I would consider as unusual.) Is anyone else having problems with the electrodes?

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    • Mine are just like… melting. I’m writing an upcoming post about my experience with it so far, which has mostly been very positive. I don’t wear it at night, though, so I’m trying to figure out why they’re breaking down so fast. I think it might be the heat or something, because they seem to be disintegrating. Bits of the gel come off when I remove the device at the end of the day, and I’ve been wearing it for 7 days. It started to break down around day 4. Glad to hear customer service is on top of things, though!

      Like

    • Carlos says

      ** Update to above

      I finally found out that the electrodes were never the problem. It ended up being a defective unit. They replace it and for the last 3 weeks, everything has worked well.

      Like

  5. Frank McGillin says

    Under normal conditions, Quell electrodes should last 2-weeks. We recommend that you remove the device and electrode to air out your skin every 4 hours (except if you are sleeping where it is ok to wait until you wake up). This also gives the gel time to “re-set”. In hot/humid situations or while exercising, you may want to leave it off for 15-30 minutes to let the electrode dry out before putting Quell on the other leg.

    If you are still having issues, please email our customer care team at customercare@quellrelief.com and we will work to find a solution.

    Like

  6. HMMM. I have a tens unit. It’s not effective enough – thoracic back pain. In a month I’m having a neuro spine stimulator inserted. I’ve done the trial. So frigging tired of pain. My dr said I. had no other options and now I see this. Has anyone had the thing done that I am going in for next? But really, ab issue for me is that medicare/medicaid will cover it. My disability check doesn’t go far enough to cover the cost of this, but I still want to know any other options in case a relative dies and leaves me some money.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Charli says

      Since I just found this website you most likely already have the Stim implanted but I have a few comments because I have had a Neuro Stim for three years. 1) The unit does block pain but only in the lower back and legs. 2) Hopefully you had the MRI receptive unit inserted. This is a huge bone of contention because those of us with any back/neck issues will at some point need an MRI and it is not possible with many of the MedTronic stimulators! No, they did not tell me there were two different models until I went in for an MRI only to be told by the radiologist it was not possible. I have since had the old one removed and replaced with the MRI receptive one but only after a huge battle with the insurance company. I hear stories frequently that some of the older units are still being inserted in patients. I do not understand why this is happening but I try to tell everyone that asks to insist they get the right model up front. MedTronic is happy to have your pain management remove the old one and put the new one in but your insurance company will want to deny it and because it is a precertification issue and very expensive it can be very challenging. Hopefully this won’t apply to you. 3) I am interested in how your stim reaches your thoracic back pain because it is my understanding it only help with lower back/legs. Maybe there is a new program that reaches higher so please share if so. I hope you have been helped and have been able to get off pain Rx because they will take on a life of their own and getting off them has been really difficult to say the least! Take care.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Hi Charli – my stimulator is from Medtronic. I was showed 2 different ones by two different companies. I don’t remember what the differences were so I don’t know why I chose this . It may have been because of the way it charged. First off, I could only have it on for two weeks. It hurt the intercostal muscles between my ribs and at times I feel as though there is a sword running through. Checking forums online with people with this injury – but not from the stimlator I found it takes 8 -12 months to heal and re injures very easy so that worries. Sometimes it is quite painful. Before surgery the doctor said it was rare to have a herniated disc so high up. T6 or 7. he said most people do it for low back. That was the first I heard about that. It meant he had to run the cord up the spine pretty high. I think the tech didn’t have the experience to set the electricity that high. I told her it felt as though it was grabbing in certain positions and she was going to adjust when I went in for adjustment but it was too late. It grabbed me one too many times. She wanted to adjust it so it would hit a different part of my body but I told her that was pointless. It was hitting the right place it was too high. I didn’t understand how to change it. ( I hate manuals) So the damage is done. I do remember asking if I’d be able to have an MRI with it in and was told yes. I don’t know if I have the unit you talked about. I could look on the manual if I knew what to look for. This was no a fun surgery. Where is your spinal scar at? Mine is between my shoulder blades, plus the one on my butt. When I was able to have it on it helped. I hope this will heal. It has been 7 months. As for meds. I’be been on pain meds for 23 years. I have ridden the roller coaster. Not much fun. I switched to methadone about 8 or 9 years ago. I don’t remember. I doesn’t get you high and dosage doesn’t increase. I have pain everywhere. Methadone makes it tolerable, but the pain in my back when I stand for more than 15 20 minutes average spreads until it is unbearable. I have to lay back to take the pressure off my spine. Sitting can be bad but I just push through it. They can’t fix me. This was the last ditch effort. It is what it is. I hope I can use this thing again later. I want to start yoga. I’m hoping the stretching will help. I did physical therapy 3 times after my liver transplant. But I will tell you – I don’t let this stop me. There are things I can’t do, like I don’t ride my bike any more. My illness also caused sever osteoporosis. But I have my writing and music. I think you found me on my blog watchandwhirl.com My main blog is mynameisjamie.net I write a prison blog and I’m writing a book right now an inmate inside for 10 years now. All that is on the other blog. Also I write and record piano music and teach. Sitting at the piano for long is painful but I do it anyway. If you want you can find my music at soundcloud.com/sonni-quick. It is music to dream by. Why did you have one put in? Is this model working for you now? I do have pain in my legs and feet and it did help with that, but I got it mostly for my back.

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      • Jerry Koudelik says

        Hi Charli: I have been internally wearing a Boston Scientific SDS that was installed about 10 years ago, which was recently replaced with a Boston Scientific 64 bit SDS unit. This new 64 bit SDS allows for up to 4 lead connected to the spine. Mine leads are connected starting is in the upper Thoracic area and run down to my lower spine. I get great coverage neck to knee, feet get some coverage but not much. I can adjust it depending on where my pain is today, more up or down the spine as I see fit. Unfortunately the Boston Scientific SDS does NOT allow for MRIs or any other magnetic fields. I can use a Tens while SDS if off but not at the same time as various signals screw things up. I have pain, head to toe, due to various stuff. Fibro, Neuropathy, nerve damage (neck and back surgery), degenerative spine disease, arthritis in spine, etc. Continue to use all the meds, Lyrica, Savella, Oxy, Norco, etcs with some relief. Wanted to let you know since you asked the question Charli.

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    • Natalie says

      I’m right there w/ you having Medicaid/Medicare & Disability is barely enough to live on. I hate that they want to insert something in your spine. That’s scary. I will pray for you! And I’m hoping you can find a way to try this first

      Like

    • Daniel says

      Make sure and get a 2nd and maybe even a 3rd if the Medi/Medi will pay for it. I know how bad it can hurt but surgery should be a very last resort because they can mess you up more than you already are.
      Good Luck and God Bless

      Liked by 1 person

    • Kevin says

      I’m sorry to hear how severe your pain is. I went through all the same things you’ve that done. I had the temporary unit done for 3 days, I was desperate for any relief at all. It gave me a little help for the 3 days. Then I had it put in to be permanent. What a mistake. it caused me even more pain than what I had originally. I had it removed and I got internal infection. Be careful what you put in your body. Feel better K…..

      Liked by 1 person

      • I have the internal one. It helped, but the tech didn’t know what she was doing and set it too high and it hurt the intintercostal muscles between the ribs which have taken a year too heal. In going to try again soon.

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    • Laura Tokgozoglu says

      I have been using Kratom for my hip pain…but the DEA in all its wisdom may make this wonderful natural leaf from Asia illegal end of the month so I need to look elsewhere for relief….I may try the Quell…I do have a TENS unit that helps a bit.

      Liked by 2 people

      • How does it even work? I’ve read articles about it, but I know very little. The Quell might help — obviously I recommend it — and I can say it helps much more than a TENS. Please let me know what you decide to do!

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      • I have never heard of Kratom. I’ll have to look it up. This thing they are trying to do with natural meds is disgusting – but corporations can’t make money from it, and that is the bottom line. My tens unit has to work in a way that most people don’t need it. It is used mostly for the lumbar area. I need it for t6 and the techs don’t know what to do with that because it isn’t normal. When the tens is on it feels good, but when the pain in there the only thing I can do is lay back

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      • Laura Tokgozoglu says

        If you are interested in Kratom you may want to buy it soon as it may be illegal the end of September. I use the Vendor Kratom King and also mmmspeciosa, and there are many others out there, just google Kratom for sale…I hope that the DEA will listen to the hundreds of thousands, even millions who are using it for pain relief and that is will stay legal.

        Liked by 1 person

  7. Pingback: Thoughts on the Quell Pain Relief Device | Wear, Tear, & Care

  8. I just strapped mine to my leg tonight and I’ll be blogging the outcome as well. So far I’m buzzing away and hoping that this is an answer to so much in the pain area of my life. My pain is due to having a brain too large to fit into my skull, so it herniates down into the spinal column creating compressed nerves and all kinds of havoc. It’s called Ghiari Malformation but I call it Squished Brain Syndrome ha! I hope the nerves know where and why to find my pain. Don’t care how it happens. Just just that it does. ☺️

    Liked by 1 person

      • It has worked for me, actually. I had a bad electrode thingy and so it didn’t go as well as I hoped on the continual progression. I need to order more and keep at it. I got sidetracked when life took a running leap and hit me head on… But it did seem to help with the pain in my neck and spine and lessened the Chiari induced headaches. I have high hopes it will continue to work well. I think maybe I screwed up in using it during yard work. From now on I am wearing a home made sock cuff around the divide to make it safe from falling dirt and leaves. I never considered dirt an issue.

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  9. I can’t wait to read more! This is very interesting. I wish it wasn’t so expensive to replace the electrodes, or that it was needed less-often. But it’s promising. I hope to see this technology come along (and get cheaper lol)

    Like

  10. painfree says

    Have any of you tried the Actipatch device ? This wearable device used to be available a few years ago and it worked wonders for me. The Actipatch uses a different technology – pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) therapy. It is not cleared by FDA for over the counter use – it is only available through a prescription now. It is available in UK and Canada over the counter. However, I have discovered that the exact same patch is available over the counter for use with pets – it is called the petpatch. The company claims that PEMF therapy helps heal the inflammation that causes the pain not just mask the pain by an opiate response (even if natural). For those who suffer from chronic pain, this is well worth a try. For reviews check out amazon.co.uk. The petpatch is available on amazon in the US or you can ask your doctor to write a prescription for you. Hope this helps.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I was actually tapped by the company that makes the Actipatch so I could review it for the Pain News Network, but they still haven’t sent me one to try out! I think I’ll try out the petpatch, though. Thanks for the tip!

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      • painfree says

        JWK: I wonder if you ended up trying the petpatch (Actipatch) I posted about. I see one good thing about the patch: it is a lot less expensive. It costs ~ $30 and lasts for months compared to Quell which is hugely more expensive both to start and for the on-going electrodes supplies. I will be curious to see what you find with the petpatch. The thing about pain relief is that, the same method doesn’t work for everyone. So, it is good to have as many drug-free options as possible. The less expensive, the better! Thanks!

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      • Hi there– I actually did try the Actipatch, and it’s next on my docket for the Pain News Network. 🙂 Stay tuned!

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    • I have actually used PEMF therapy on an extremely ill horse. She was healed back to good as new. We previously thought we would have to put her down! Then my husband used it on his legs that were cramping. I think it created new veins for the blood flow. He quit having the cramps. In later years the doctor was amazed his legs had not been hurting him as they did need some attention. But I believe it does help with the pain. It also helped me with pain from a poorly healed break.

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  11. Janet Keene says

    Does anyone use this for pain from pancreatitis? I figure it might help with the back pain, but wasn’t sure how it would work with the abdominal pain. Anyone out there tried it ???

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    • God, sorry, I read this and then forgot to reply. Are you talking an acute type of pain or chronic pancreatitis? I think either way it would work. It seems to dull everything. Give it a shot!

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  12. Jessica says

    Hi!
    I’ve had hip pain for the last year and a half and nothing i’ve tried so far seems to help. I found this yesterday while googling “how to fix chronic hip pain” yes, silly I know. lol But i came across the quell device. How has it been working for you? Are you still using it?

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    • Hi Jessica! Yes, I am still using it, and it definitely works. I wear it every day, though not at night (I still find that the vibration gets too distracting). When I take it off to wash the band or whatever, I very much notice the difference. The pain starts creeping back in after about 15 minutes of having it off. I’d give it a whirl if I were you! 🙂

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  13. Lois says

    Hi, I just heard about this device on the news and went online to look for the website and found this blog. Can I use this device if I have hip replacements in both hips? I have osteoarthritis and now the cartilage in my knees is deteriorating and I’m just not ready for knee replacement yet. I have ceramic and titanium implants. Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Lois! I don’t know anything but my personal experience, though people have reported to me that it works for more than what it says on the tin (fibro, sciatica, diabetic neuropathy, and I think there was one other one). Me personally, I have pain all the way up to my head, and this definitely works for me. I’d imagine that since the Quell is working closer to the knees and hips, it would work well for you. I’d email them specifically re: the titanium implants, but I don’t remember reading that on any of the contraindications. Meanwhile, their company is super excited to talk with people about it. Give it a try, and good luck!

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    • I have a hip replacement and have been using Quell for about six weeks to good effect. I see no reason not to use it because of the titanium in my body.

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      • Janet Steigleman says

        Saw your comment re using Quell with your hip replacement implant. How are you doing at this point in time ? (Your comment was dated Dec. 2015 ). I had total hip replacement Oct. of 2014 & no problems with that. I would love to try Quell for some other pain areas but was hesitant to try it with titanium in my hip. I appreciate any info you provide.

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  14. Christelle says

    Hi, I’m so glad the Quell is working for you! Do you think it would work for endometriosis pain? I live in Lebanon so replacing the device is not an option once i buy it.
    Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Christelle! I’d imagine that it would work for that area, given that it also helps sciatica and neuropathy in the lower half of the body, so I can’t see why it wouldn’t help. If I were you I’d reach out to the Quell team to ask, just so you don’t end up wasting the money. They’re really helpful about answering questions. All I know is that my pain is all over the place and not the type of pain they advertise for the device, so I do think it helps off-label conditions like yours and mine! (Man, they should put me on their payroll!! 😀 )

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      • Christelle says

        Hahahah they should put you on their payroll!
        Thank you for your reply, you’re helping a lot of people.
        I’m going to write them today 🙂
        Be well!

        Like

  15. Jill price says

    Hi. Im looking into trying quell. I have fibromyalgia arthritis tmj restless leg endometriosis has any one used it for any of this. I have alot of medication allergies over the counter n prescriptions. Im highly allergic to narcotics so this could b life altering for me. Im on a disability. It will b hard for me to save enough to be able to buy one. I wish we could start a website that has ppl who cares to sponsor and or donate to ppl who have trouble to get one. Of to help pass ones down to others who are not happy w theirs or happen to pass on into heaven. It would be nice to help ppl in need of it. I know the pain struggle and trying to get help in if. It just is not out there like ppl think. Any one?? Ideas or have tried it for my symptoms?? Anything will help. Im trying to sell some of my things just to get one. Thank you Love to jear from some one.

    Liked by 1 person

    • It definitely works for fibro. I’m not sure about the rest of your ailments, but at the very least I think they’d be improved. I’m wondering if you ask Quell for a trial run, maybe they’d say yes? If you gave them a credit card number for insurance or something, maybe they’d offer a month-long trial so you can see if it works. Plus, not that it’s much consolation, medical items are deductible on tax returns! 😀

      Like

    • Jerry Koudelik says

      Hi Jill; You mentioned about starting a web site for people to sponsor you, well there already is such a site. Here you go: https://www.gofundme.com/ There may even be other site for the same purpose. Jerry

      Like

  16. I have been suffering with degenerative disc disease in my lumbar and cervicle spine. I have had a fusion which helped for about 2 years, but now the pain is back with a vengence. if this device works it would change my life. says

    I will take this blog to my doctor who writes out my pain pill prescriptions. Maybe he can give me advice as to whether I should try this.

    Like

    • Hi Lenore! I don’t work for Quell, so I can only say how it’s worked for me — and it’s been a lifesaver. It doesn’t get rid of all the pain by any means, but it makes it quiet enough that I can get through my day without wanting to rip my spine out. Since it “hooks in” right behind the calf, I feel like it would also hook right into any knee pain you have. The achilles, I’m not sure, but again, all those nerves are connected, so I’d at least give it a shot! I know they’ll let you return it if you don’t like it. A friend of mine had to return hers because it irritated her skin too much (conversely, for me, it only irritates the skin if I turn it up really, really high). Good luck! Let me know how it goes!

      Like

    • Linda Yuknevich says

      I purchased the quell for knee pain and a pain in my upper right arm……I wear it about 4 hours a day and occasionally at night…..so far the pain in my arm disappeared and the Arthritis in my knee is much better…..but as a side effect my neuropathy in my feet including numbness is almost all gone and I am using it just about a month…..Very happy except for the cost of the electrodes every month…..
      TheDancingChef

      Liked by 1 person

      • Linda, I am so glad! I hope you keep feeling better and better. Does it ever bother you, wearing it at night?

        Like

  17. Devin says

    I have had a Quell for 3 days. I tried wearing it a night and twice it died on me during the night – totally unresponsive to the button. It is not in therapy mode, probably not in break mode since the button is completely dead. Took it off, waited a bit and it restarted OK. Happened again less than an hour later.

    Have any of you guys had your die like I am describing?

    Like

    • I’d reach out to customer service. From what I’ve heard, they’re super good about replacing defective units, and yours sounds defective to me. Mine’s lasted since the summer so far with no problems.

      Like

  18. 1ST;THANK YOU….for the time,patience and kindness not to mention service you are providing..(.i got nothing that don’t hurt.)..they say osteoarthritis but explain the misshapen finger joints, had back surgery (laser) compression fracture at L2. I guess the one at L1 healed. Cut off R index finger (1st knuckle). No circulation
    saw the QUELL and your blogs. I have fallen many times, did a lot of lifting at the USPS and I’m 79 years of age. It would be nicer if the mind were as dull as the body, The barometric pressure seems to have a strong influence(Lows & falling)
    Could Quell. help? r side butt pain, shoulder and neck..knees shot,,,bone on bone, or should I look for Kervorkian’s successo?

    Thanks, Lynne Arendell-Kaiser Missouri City Tx 77459, cell 2815091844.Lynne

    Liked by 1 person

    • Oh honey! Don’t you dare find Kevorkian’s successor! I’m so sorry that you hurt so much, and it sounds like you hurt all over. That’s the worst. And I definitely hear you on barometric pressure having a strong influence, I swear that humid days, rainy days, cold days, super hot days — there’s a rhyme and reason, but good luck convincing doctors. Blech.

      I’m just a patient like you, but I can say that I’m A.) wearing the Quell right now, B.) have conditions that are considered “off-label,” and C.) find it to be extremely, extremely helpful. My only complaints are that it can irritate the skin (I’ve found that putting on lotion prior to wearing the Quell helps this), it distracts me at night (so I don’t wear it when I go to bed), and I feel weird wearing anything that reveals the device, like a skirt. It doesn’t get rid of the pain, but it dulls it considerably, enough that you can resume former activities without wanting to go crazy. I think it might help for your back pain and knees at the very least. Your pain seems to cover a lot of the same real estate as mine does.

      Feel free to email me if you’re going bonkers — I know that even significant others can have a hard time getting it. Jennifer@writmore.com. I hope you have a better day today!

      Like

      • jim ford says

        Hi jen can i call you jen my name is jim i brought guell about two weeks ago and i think its working I got staff infecion in 2008 from a niddle in lower back tryed just about everything if guell works i would be so frinking happy

        Like

      • Hi Jim — I’m so sorry for my delayed reply. Have you had any more luck with the Quell yet? I hope it’s working more for you. And of course you can call me Jen! 😀

        Like

  19. Christina Los says

    I have a question …. i just came across this device last night ..tears rolled down my eyes as I thought that I might actually be without pain, or at least, less pain. I have lower back pain plus am waiting for knee replacement. I have used a TENS for my back for many years. QUESTION: Does the Quell address these issues? I will try anything to make walking easier esp. if I can take my dream trip to England & be able to walk.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Christina Los, don’t cry! We’re all here with you. 🙂

      Lower back pain is one of my problems. Knees, not so much — I have sciatica that goes down my legs and affects my knees, though. I know other people who’ve commented have had luck with it for knee-related problems. I mean, it straps onto the calf, so it’s right there affecting those nerves. I can tell you (as a fellow patient) that it definitely helps my low-back pain. It won’t get rid of the pain entirely, but you and I both know that anything less than normal is a win-win. The only downside I have experienced so far is the irritation to my skin, but lotion helps with that. I also know how hard traveling is with chronic pain. I’d give it a whirl if I were you! I don’t work for Quell, but I’ll keep singing its praises — I’m still wearing mine six months later.

      Like

  20. Sharon Schifano says

    My husband has terrible neuropathy pain in his feet. Besides tingling and numbness on the bottoms of his feet his toes feel like they are frost bitten even when warm to the touch and are very painful. Has anyone experienced relief with Quell for such pain?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Sharon! Are you talking about a sort of diabetic neuropathy? I only ask because my dad has the same symptoms. I have peripheral neuropathy in my feet that the Quell seems to help, but I think you should ask them directly. I’m only a patient myself, so I don’t want to lead you astray! Good luck, please let me know if your husband decides to try it.

      Like

  21. Sharon Schifano says

    Thanks for your reply. Yes, it appears to be diabetic neuropathy. You say that your dad has similar symptoms. Has he tried the Quell?

    Like

  22. I have a daughter that has Dysautonomia and Ehler Danlos 3. She suffers from chronic pain that is mostly nueropathic. …Mostly in the lower back right now but some joint pain as well that mimics fibromyalgia or R.A. We are looking for some pain relief for her instead of prescription meds or trips to the ER for IV pain meds. She has already had a lumbar injection of steroids that have not worked as well. I am wondering if anyone that has used this device or someone with Quell would know if this would be good for her.

    Like

    • Hi there — I have sciatica and some joint pain, and it definitely helps those conditions. I’d reach out to Quell directly. Their team is always happy to answer questions, and I’m sure that someone has tried it for your daughter’s conditions. They might be able to save you time. all I can tell you is that the Quell absolutely works for more than what it says on the packaging. Please let me know how it goes!

      Like

    • Atom says

      My son has Elhers Danlos and has been wearing the quell for about three months and found it very helpful. Much relief for him for his all over body pain.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Naomi says

        My daughter has EDS with amplified muscular skeletal pain. Its pretty intense (IV pain med) type of lower back pain. How intense is your sons pain at its worse?

        Like

      • So glad to hear that Quell is working to relieve your son’s EDS pain, Atom! We have heard from quite a few people with EDS who have reported having success with Quell. Everyone’s different though, so we always encourage people to take advantage of our 60 day money back guarantee and try Quell for themselves.
        Naomi – We hope your daughter will be able to try Quell and get benefits as well!

        Like

    • I’d email them (Quell people) directly and ask, they’re always really eager to help. It’s basically a super-TENS unit. Are you allowed to use normal TENS units?

      Like

  23. mark saling says

    I have many pain issues 2 knee scopes 2 major shoulder surgeries 2 wrist surgeries 2 spinal fusions. Pain and me have been best friends for years. I was a roofer for 29 years and the toll that puts on your body is amazing in its own rights. This item helps a lot with sciatica foot pain knee and my shoulder pain. It does not help with my back pain but I need another fusion. When you are in constant high level pain you will try anything. I am now taking one less pain pill and one less lyrica and that is well worth the price it cost. Not a cure all but it helps.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’m sorry you’re in so much pain! So are you on the Quell now and it helped you lower the pills? I’m hoping to get off the Lyrica entirely, especially because I think this latest fusion is really helping. Plus it looks like the refill was denied for whatever reason, so I guess maybe I’ll be off the Lyrica anyway! 😀

      Like

      • mark saling says

        I just saw your question I stopped taking the lyrica for my leg and glute pain. maybe one 75mg per day. Quell works great for that pain not the low back pain. I use it on the leg I have the pain in.

        Like

      • mark saling says

        I forgot to mention if you don’t set up the device it will not work properly. I wear mine 24/7 I saw you take it off at night. If I don’t check the battery and it dies at night I wake up from pain or can hardly walk when I wake up. In the app you set it to lower the power output at night and I sleep through it fine. The app and the setup make all the difference. I purchased a second one for both legs or always have one charging.

        Like

  24. Pingback: Quell for Pain Management | Sonya Huber

    • Hi Doris! I’m so sorry about your brother and his pain. I’d email Quell directly, but my sense is that it shouldn’t affect his heart condition unless he has something like a pacemaker installed. Then the electricity would most likely interfere with that, which we want to avoid. Quell is super helpful and quick to respond! Please let me know what they say, and good luck!

      Like

    • Doris – Thanks for your interest in Quell. If your brother is suffering from widespread pain due to his gout and it is lasting for an extended period, Quell is likely worth trying. We do offer a 60 day return policy, so he could certainly try Quell to determine whether he benefits from it.
      Quell is contraindicated if you have a cardiac pacemaker, implanted defibrillator, or other implanted metallic or electronic device. However, there are no known safety issues and we suggest that you discuss Quell with your doctor to see if it makes sense for you.

      Like

      • Natalie P says

        So are you saying that I could not try this b/c I have an ICD? I’m in heart failure & am a Left Above Knee amputee. My lower back pain plus my nerve pain is off the charts. I have bruises from punching my leg in the middle of the night to relieve the pain even just a bit. And is there anything else like Quell that wouldn’t be contraindicated?😬🙏🏼😊

        Like

      • Hey Emily, can you please help Natalie here? I’m not sure what the answer would be, and I’d trust the Quell team far above my own personal experience. Maybe if she discussed it with her doctor there’d be a way to do it? Natalie, have you been able to use any sort of TENS device with the ICD?

        Like

  25. PainFree says

    The Actipatch device that I mentioned in the comments here as a cheap alternative has been featured in dailymail, UK “Pulsing skin patch could end the misery of chronic pain for arthritis sufferers and diabetics” (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-3555221/The-20-pulsing-skin-patch-end-misery-chronic-pain-arthritis-sufferers-diabetics.html). You should read the comments of the dailymail readers – it is unbelievable how many in the UK and rest of the world are benefiting from these inexpensive devices. As I mentioned before, the per version is available here in the US which I have used to great success.

    Like

  26. Natalie Prince says

    I read they all the comments but none really answered my personal questions. First, has anyone with any type of ICD, pacemaker, defib. actually tried Quell? Obviously I see that it’s contraindicated but it also says talk to your doctor. As an above the knee amputee (in heart failure) w/ an ICD, I’m looking for actual pain relief. I’m currently on Suboxone. It barely takes the edge off but then again my tolerance for it is low. I usually take Promethazine to combat the effects of all my heart meds plus pain meds. It really messes w/ your quality of life. I’m thankful (to God) that I survived the heart attack. Now I just need to be able to do His work. Thanks & God bless everyone that has posted here

    Like

    • Hi Natalie — I am so sorry for your pain, and I am sorry none of the comments was able to answer you. I’d reach out to the Quell team directly, but they’ll probably say to check with your doctor. I’d check with both! Please let me know what they say so we can help other people like you, too! ❤

      Like

    • Natalie – The FDA requires that all electrical nerve stimulators, including Quell, carry contraindications against use if you have a cardiac pacemaker, implanted defibrillator, or other implanted metallic or electronic device. However, there are no known safety issues for Quell and we do have users who are using the device successfully with a cardiac pacemaker (Eliska A. described her experience in a Facebook review https://www.facebook.com/eliska.adema/posts/10207807861255325:0). We always recommend that you speak to your doctor because he/she will have a more detailed understanding of your particular situation. Please don’t hesitate to contact the Quell Customer Care team at 800-204-6577 if you have additional questions.

      Like

  27. Nikita says

    Has anyone tried freezing the patches? If there anything like the tenz unit patches, you might be able to prolong the life of the gel/sticky goo by freezing them for 20 to 30 minutes when it starts to loose it’s sticking strength. I’m asking because I own a Tenz unit and it helps for a little while but I don’t think I’ve figured out how to properly use it. So I’m really wanting to try Quell, but I need be sure I’ve done all the research I can. IE: hacks, discounts, reviews, comparison checks…

    Like

    • Hi Nikita! I’ve never tried freezing the patches, but now that it’s getting so hot out I definitely think I will have to try it. Plus I can imagine that it feels amazing!! As for you trying Quell and doing comparison research, there really isn’t anything else on the market like it. Normal TENS units are local in that they only relieve the area where you apply the patches. Quell really does affect the whole body even though you’re wearing it on your leg. The initial hit of paying for the device isn’t fun, but it relieves a good deal of my pain in a way that normal TENS units can’t. I know they have a really good trial period (60 days, I think), so if you don’t find relief, you can get your money back! (And no, they don’t pay me to say these things!) 🙂

      Like

  28. George Wallot says

    I have some experience with tens devices for lower back pain. Regards the expensive electrodes: there is a way to replace the adhesive which will greatly extend the life of them. It is Tensive conductive gel. You can re adhesive several times greatly increasing the life and reducing the cost of Tens therapy. Bought mine on the internet. Good and pain free luck.

    Liked by 1 person

  29. Pingback: The Quell Pain Relief Device: One Year Later | Wear, Tear, & Care

  30. B Abrams says

    Does anyone know if you can use the Quell if you have a Medtronic Reveal LINQ cardiac monitor ?

    Like

    • Quell is contraindicated if you have a cardiac pacemaker, implanted defibrillator, or other implanted metallic or electronic device. The last category is the one into which your cardiac monitor would fall. There are no known safety issues, but we suggest that you discuss Quell with your doctor to see if it makes sense for you.

      Like

    • Hi there! Since the Quell is closest to a TENS unit, I think those are generally contraindicated for heart conditions. However, since the device is worn on the calf and because a stent isn’t necessarily a pacemaker, I think you might be able to get away with it. Either way I would still ask the Quell team, they’re very nice and super informative. Please let me know what they say — I’m trying to build a compendium of conditions for people who ask about it. 🙂 Good luck!

      Like

      • Kevin Killelea says

        I think I found the answer. A women questioned if her husband , who has a stent ,could use Quell and the response, from Quell, was yes. I can not confirm the response is from Quell but it does look like there logo. I called their office but they are closed until Tues.

        Like

    • Quell is contraindicated if you have a cardiac pacemaker, implanted defibrillator, or other implanted metallic or electronic device. A cardiac stent would fall under this contraindication umbrella. However, there are no known safety issues and we suggest that you discuss Quell with your doctor to see if it makes sense for you. Generally, active devices, such as pacemakers, require more caution than passive implanted devices, such as stents or orthopedic hardware. But again, it’s always best to consult your doctor!

      Like

  31. PortlandPaige says

    Has anyone had issues with their skin breaking out? I went about 8 months with great relief and no problems, wearing overnight only. Now my skin breaks out in a red bumpy rash every time I use my Quell. I’ve tried everything: Alternate placement, moisturizer, lessened intensity, looser/tighter band, tensile gel, skin protectant prior to use, different nighttime settings, new electrodes more frequently…and still I’m having issues. I suspect shaving doesn’t help but I can’t really go more than 4 days without shaving. If anyone can offer advice, please do! I notice when I can’t wear my Quell that my pain returns, especially as I’m falling asleep.

    Like

    • If you’ve not done so already, please contact our Customer Care team so we can keep trying to find a solution for you to help prevent the irritation you’ve been experiencing. The general rule of thumb is to remove the device every 4 hours (you’ll experience the long term wear alert pulse at the end of 5 hours of continuous wear) to ventilate the skin and to discontinue use of the device over areas of irritation, as therapy can further irritate compromised skin. It does sound like you’ve explored many of the options we recommend, but it’s always helpful to have a more detailed conversation live to ensure we’re not missing anything. You can reach the team at 800-204-6577.

      Like

  32. Ernest D'Andrea says

    I started wearing my Quell three days ago…..when it is operating, it causes my leg to itch very much……is there a remedy to this?…..I really want this machine to work…..if it doesn’t, my next stop is the operating room…..Thank You

    Like

    • Hi Ernest — I don’t wear mine at night in order to give my skin time to rest, since that’s when I take the super heavy meds I don’t take during the day. Then I use one of those Neosporin intense Eczema skin lotions since those are intended for sensitive, inflamed skin. That generally calms it down for the next day (especially if it’s a kind that has oatmeal in it). I hope that helps!

      Like

    • Ernest – Please don’t hesitate to contact the Quell Customer Care team at 800-204-6577 so we can help you! We recommend that you move the device every 4 hours to allow your skin to air out. If your skin is especially dry, you may need to moisturize it 20-30 minutes prior to starting therapy to ensure it’s well hydrated. It would be helpful to learn more before we make additional recommendations. Please call us!

      Like

  33. I would like to know if this quell would work for my back and leg pain. I have had 3 lower back surgeries for herniated discs and now have permanent nerve damage. I have limited success with TENS and take narcotics daily for the pain. I have lost my job due to my injury and slowly losing my ability to walk. Dr says it could get worse soon. Anything that could help reduce the pain and meds and increase mobility would be greatly appreciated. some days I can’t even get out of bed.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Hi Rick! I am so, so sorry for all of your pain, that sounds exhausting. The Quell is strongest for lower-back injuries. I have injuries at the lumbar, thoracic, and cervical, and I’ve found that it’s strongest at the bottom and gets less effective on my injuries as it rises, but the lumbar and thoracic are definitely covered. I think it might do really well for you. Either way, I am fairly positive they have a good money-back guarantee, so you can always test it out and see if it works for you. Please give it a try and let me know what you think! I really hope it works for you.

      Like

    • Quell is broadly indicated for the relief of chronic pain. We’re hearing from patients with a wide variety of chronic pain conditions, including back pain and leg pain, who have reported experiencing relief with Quell. Everyone is different, so we can’t tell you definitively whether you will get relief with Quell, but we offer a 60 day money back so you can try it risk-free.

      Like

  34. Marna says

    I purchased a Quell about a month ago and have mixed feelings about it. After reading the posts I’m wondering if the fact I have a fusion in my lower back with rods etc. makes this device not work as well. I see others have talked about fusions so I assume they have used the Quell even with metal in their backs. Guess I should call Quell and ask them. Gosh I want this to work! Also, is there an exact place on the calf where those gel pads should go?

    Like

    • Hi Marna! I’m so sorry it’s not working as well for you. Generally the gel pads go an inch or two below the knee. I would definitely give them a call, maybe the power isn’t up enough or something? I want it to work for you!!!!!!! ❤

      Like

  35. Emily says

    Hello I have fibromyalgia and I have been researching this device for a while. How is quell doing for you now? Do you still have the same relief ?
    hope to hear from you soon!!

    Like

  36. Jennifer says

    I’d love to know that myself Emily! I have horrendous fibromyalgia and would LOVE to know if this truly works well and is worth purchasing. I also have neuropathy and this would mean sooooooo much if this really helps!

    Like

  37. I have been using my Quell to help with severe chronic sciatica pain. Nothing helped. I was popping Ibuprofen every 4 hours without relief, I was nervous about starting to use the Quell because I had tried a TENS and it was painful and not that helpful. To my amazement, my pain had decreased from a 10 to a 2 within approximately. 30 minutes of use, following calibration of the Quell unit. I love it. I found that keeping my legs cleanly shaven and applying lotion to my leg prior to application of the electrodes makes the electrodes last longer and prevents them from sticking uncomfortably to the leg when they are removed. I just bought a Quell unit for my husband who fell and broke his shoulder at work. I hope it helps him as much as it has helped me. It does not work for everyone, so I have read.

    Like

  38. I have fibromyalgia, which gives me pain all over. Some days are good, others vary bad (flares). I have all the medication I need from my rheumatologist, but she has shared with me that within 5 years she probably won’t be able to prescribe Tramadol or Vicodin. In the future there may be cannabis extracts that may help. For now, I decided to try Quell, which I read about in emails that I get about fibro therapy. My hope is to be able to lower my use and eventually not need the pain meds. With my doctor’s approval, I ordered the starter kit and received it about 10 days ago. I have had a similar experience to the author. Although it hasn’t completely eliminated my pain, it has helped a great deal. The intro to Quell in the quick start guide says that it may take some time to get maximum relief. Whether or not I get more relief, the Quell device is already worth it! I was starting to have a flare a few days ago, and with the use of Quell off and on during the day and also during sleep, I have not needed the additional pain meds that I normally need during a flare. The flare seems to be going away already, when it can usually take up to two weeks to ease up.

    Like

  39. Hickory says

    No, I don’t have one. Yes, I have chronic pain. I’ve had chronic pain for 15 years. No, I won’t be getting one. Why? In a nutshell, every post on this I’ve read qualifies as what is called “success bias” due to the placebo effect. Not only don’t people who it doesn’t work for post here, but if they did, you’d run them off. As you will me. I feel your pain. Literally. But falling for still another scam doesn’t make you feel better.

    Like

    • I’m sorry you feel that way. I don’t mean to run anyone off. All I can share is my own experience. I’ve worn mine for 1.5 years now, and when I didn’t wear it for two weeks because I legitimately forgot, I felt much worse and couldn’t figure out why until I walked through my normal routine and realized what the difference was. That was enough convincing for me. But I know that not every device works for everybody! I hope you find some comfort, if not from this than from something else soon.

      Like

    • Hickory – We understand your skepticism. There are quite a few products out there for the treatment of chronic pain and not all are created equal. Quell won’t work for everyone because, as you know, pain is a highly individual experience. 81% of participants in our user study reported a reduction in their chronic pain while using Quell, so the technology won’t be a fit for roughly 1 out of 5 people. If you’d like to see additional user feedback Quell product reviews on Amazon or other retailer sites will give you a larger number of opinions (Amazon has about 500 reviews on Quell). If you do decide to consider Quell, please know we have a 60 day money back guarantee and a Boston-based Customer Care team here to support you.

      Like

  40. Kathi says

    Has anyone tried this for bad migraines? Also, is this device safe for use during pregnancy?

    Like

    • Kathi – Unfortunately, Quell is unlikely to provide relief from migraine pain because they occur in a different area of the brain than the one that Quell affects. Quell can be used by pregnant women as long as it is placed as instructed on the upper calf. If you have any questions, please consult your doctor.

      Like

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